Sneak Peek Photos of Our New Locomotives

Today we are debuting the first round of our new electric Siemens locomotives in Sacramento. They're called Cities Sprinters and they'll replace our entire electric fleet in the Northeast Corridor by 2016.  That's 70 locomotives, a $466 million investment and the creation and preservation of jobs in 60 cities across the country.

Did we mention that they're more energy efficient and will be able to reach speeds of 125 mph?

Check out four sneak peek photos of our new locomotives!

Amtrak City Sprinter (ACS-64)

The Amtrak Cities Sprinter (ACS-64) locomotives are being assembled at the solar-powered Siemens’ rail manufacturing plant in Sacramento, California.

Interior of the ACS-64

Building the Amtrak Cities Sprinter locomotives is providing work for 69 suppliers in 61 cities from 23 states.

ACS-64 Side View

The Cities Sprinter locomotives, which will operate on our Northeast Regional trains at speeds up to 125 mph, are designed to improve reliability, efficiency and mobility.

Mr. Boardman and Mr. Cahill with the ACS-64

Joe Boardman, Amtrak President & CEO, (left) and Michael Cahill, President of Siemens Rail Systems division in the U.S., stand with one of the new Amtrak Cities Sprinter locomotives.

 

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18 comments
RichardBowley
RichardBowley

Did you guys use NJ Transit's ALP-45DP and ALP-46 locomotives as the "baseline" for the City Sprinters?

DavidSmith10
DavidSmith10

Thanks Kevin, I know about those trains that's not what I was referring too. !!!!

BobHarris1
BobHarris1

Hope you will post information about shakedown scheduling for the NEC testing of the single unit.  Some of us will travel there to see it.

DanielJWebster
DanielJWebster

Just a procedural question...How do you get an electric engine from Sacramento to the NE Corridor?  Can you put it in neutral and have a diesel pull them to DE Shops or what?

DavidSmith10
DavidSmith10

Maybe AMTRAK RAIL should come to Canada to show Via Rail how to invest in passenger rail !!!!

tonhag
tonhag

why are the engines in the USA not aerodynamically designed like their counterparts in Europe & Japan?

jbs319
jbs319

@DanielJWebster will likely get thrown either on a freight train or behind the P42s on the California Zephyr. One, at least is going to Pueblo for FRA testing and certification.

KevinHoward1
KevinHoward1

Amtrak does go to Canada. Cascades, Maple Leaf, and Adirondack

BigRedBK
BigRedBK

@tonhag  The European counterpart to this engine is the EuroSprinter by Siemens which looks almost identical. As others have mentioned, these are meant to be bi-directional workhorses, and not part of a bullet train. That being said, they can still go "higher speed" at 125mph, which is hit quite often on the NE Corridor. By the comparison, the Acela (which is a full train set) is more streamlined and currently operates up to 150mph, with a 160mph stretch opening in a few years. Its replacements will be at least as streamlined as it and also go at least 160.

JoeTrudo
JoeTrudo

@tonhag American design is so handicapped by ludicrous FRA crashworthness requirements that dictate all rail vehicles be built like tanks and able to survive a direct nuclear strike (OK nasty collision) which makes them very heavy and not so streamlined. Bureaucrats stuck in 1919!  

aidancheddar
aidancheddar

@tonhag They're not designed to reach speeds of 200mph due to the tracks Amtrak runs on.

grantmasterflash
grantmasterflash

@tonhag This is not a high speed locomotive. It CAN do 125 mph but won't. The TGV/ICE/AVE type trains in Europe are designed for 200 mph.

RichardBowley
RichardBowley

That, of couse is due to the age of the PRR/Penn Central and New Haven Railroad infrastructure the Acela runs on.

jbs319
jbs319

@grantmasterflash @tonhag actually, these WILL do 125 mph and probably CAN do much much more. and they're far more streamlined than the AEM7s they will be replacing.

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